Suffer the Children, by Robert Earle

Two stars

First and foremost, a large thank you to NetGalley, Robert Earle, and Vook Publishing for providing me with a copy of this book, which allows me to provide you with this review.

In a novel whose content is ripped from the headlines, Earle seeks to address the issue of school shootings and how they could be alleviated. Budge Kleeforth and Pru Malveaux are deeply moved when news of another shooting at a small-town America school. They begin working together on a concept that could alleviate said shootings by arming teachers and administrators with a non-lethal concept weapon meant to disable any would-be shooters. With this weapon comes a complete school training package, which would show children how to react in the event that a shooter appeared on the premises. The sell is hard and has blowback all the way into the White House, but they move forward in a small pilot project. However, the fallout from the school shooting is far-reaching and Earle examines a host of characters and how they feel about events, as well as this newly hatched plan to ‘arm the classrooms of America’. Working through a sordid past together, Kleeforth and Malveaux begin their project and the idea gains momentum, as well as the panicked attention of the gun lobby. Earle utilises a multi-layered technique to tell the single story from a variety of angles, as well as bringing things home in an ending that puts the entire project to the test. An interesting concept by Earle, seeking to address an issue with which many readers will be aware.

The novel’s title is perhaps a little misrepresentative. As I trudged through this piece, I felt it was better named “Suffer the Reader”, as the story dragged and the characters remained distant and free of depth. The concept for the novel is wonderful, though the angle of approach leaves readers unsure where to look. To say that it is the political aspect of shoot shootings and guns in America is also misleading, as the book does not have a single and direct focus. Earle presents his soapbox issue clearly, that school shootings need to end in a way that does not beget more, but he skims over things and pushes the reader into situations that fog the issue and keeps his characters from grounding themselves or reaching out to the reader. I had hoped for a high-impact novel about the politics and the emotional reaction to a shooting, but received more of a technical analysis of the problem and two characters trying to change the system, while remaining behind the proverbial curtain and peeking out only when necessary. Earle has much potential with which he can work, but failed to shape this into the explosive novel it should have been.

Interesting concept, Mr. Earle, but it failed to pull me in or keep my rapt attention. 

Advertisements