A Murder of Crows: A Short Sequel to The Magpies, by Mark Edwards

Nine stars

Mark Edwards made his fans wait for a time, but the delay only churned up excitement for the formal sequel to his debut novel. After the horrors that befell him in his London flat, Jamie Knight fled the country and the long-reaching grasp of Lucy Newton. Now in Australia, Jamie is trying to piece his life back together. After running into an acquaintance and sparking a renewed interest in all things Lucy Newton, Jamie receives a message on a fan page from a distressed woman, someone who seems to be suffering the same plight as he did. Might Lucy be back at it, now that her charges have been dismissed? Jamie takes the plunge and travels back to the UK, seeking to help Anita with her neighbour issue, while also trying to reconnect with his former partner, Kirsty. Jamie can only hope that Kirsty has forgiven him for all the horrors they went through at the hands of that wretch, Lucy. After arriving and trying to help Anita coax Lucy out of her safe cocoon, Jamie realises that this will be just as difficult the second time around. Armed with new ideas and a stronger intuition, Jamie forges ahead, but Lucy Newton is not one to be messed with lightly. She is hungry for revenge, and Jamie is the ideal target. Edwards jams so much into this short story that the reader will barely have time to breathe. A sensational piece that will sate fans of The Magpies, while leaving them wondering.

Edwards has done it again, piquing the interest of his readers with this stellar piece of writing. I flipped back and confirmed that the first in this series (if one can call it that) was my first attempt at reading Mark Edwards. I loved it then and continue to enjoy the intricacies that are found within the story and narrative. While a shorter piece, Edwards is still able to imbue his characters with some wonderful attributes, especially as Jamie is saddled by the guilt of the original Lucy Newton debacle. Jamie is also seen to be that eternal superhero, helping both Anita and working to build on his past relationship with Kirsty, for what it’s worth. Lucy is, as many Edwards fans remember her, a wicked woman whose constant plotting and conniving had be seen with everything she does. The story earns some of its eerie nature as the renewed Jamie-Lucy clash is presented, though adding the likes of Anita into the mix only thickens the plot more. The story might be brief, but there is much to enjoy within the fourteen chapters, as the narrative forges onward through to a climactic ending. In true Edwards fashion, there is a dangling thread and fans can only hope that it is not forgotten or left blowing around for another five years. Those readers interested in this piece are encouraged to try The Magpies for the full effect. I became a quick fan of Mark Edwards by doing so and am sure many readers will follow in my footsteps.

Kudos, Mr. Edwards, for another brilliant piece. I cannot wait for your next novel and anything else you may have in the works!

A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/248185-a-book-for-all-seasons

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