Tombland (Matthew Shardlake #7), by C.J. Sansom

Nine stars

C.J. Sansom continues to impress with this set of Tudor era historical mysteries. Combing legal conundrums with historical controversies, the reader is taken back to relive some of the most tumultuous times during Tudor reign. Much has changed since the death of King Henry VIII, though England is still trying to get its legs under Edward VI and his council of advisors. Matthew Shardlake has remained scarce, but is under the employ of the Lady Elizabeth, who comes to him with an interesting legal matter. One of her distant relatives is about to go on trial for murder and Shardlake is needed to advise the local barristers and provide any investigative service he can. Armed with this mission—as well as a request for pardon from Lady Elizabeth, if it be necessary—Shardlake heads out to Norfolk with his legal assistant. Missing his former companion, Barak, Shardlake thinks back on all the trouble caused this friend during some of their adventures. Along the way, Shardlake encounters much resistance to his presence, particularly when it becomes known that he is from London, as there is a strong rebellion brewing in the area. While Shardlake seeks to help a distant Boleyn relative, he must tread lightly, for there are foes on both sides, including a handful connected to the family itself. During a brief trial, Shardlake sees just how loose justice seems to be in this domain, but will not rest until the real murderer is fingered and punished. With all this going on, a rebel uprising to protest the treatment of the locals by rich landlords is gaining steam, pitting two groups with whom Matthew Shardlake has connections against one another. Pulled into the middle of something that has no easy solution, Shardlake and his crew are soon vilified and taken as prisoners, with room for them at the gallows. England is yet again on the verge of something epic, though Shardlake would be just as happy to solve this murder and return to the safety of his own home. Detailed and full of historical research, C.J. Sansom has penned a stellar novel that will pull series fans into an adventure they will not soon forget. Highly recommended to those who love the Shardlake series, as well as readers who love English history with a twist.

The Matthew Shardlake novels are not ones that the casual reader will necessarily enjoy, as they are so full of history and nuanced characters, both of which tend to favour those who have the time to absorb the details. C.J. Sansom offers much the reader can enjoy, while developing storylines throughout this series. As history and mystery compete throughout, the reader learns much about both, alongside the series protagonist. Matthew Shardlake is a refreshing character whose development has not waned over the series. While not alluring in a physical sense, Shardlake has much to offer with his mind and actions to keep the reader enthralled. Shardlake has moved throughout the Tudor period, affixed to many key characters, but is always able to separate himself from the fray and focus on his legal work, even if it takes him on tangential adventures. Throughout the piece, the reader will see an evolution in the Shardlake character, adding personal nuances that help to enrich the series in new ways. There are many returning characters whose presence offers a means of propelling the narrative forward while also adding to Shardlake’s larger impact on the series. These characters, and those who make their debut in this novel, permit C.J. Sansom to effectively educate and entertain the cautious reader. As the series continues to develop, its key elements change and leave the reader wondering what is to come. Sansom admits in the epilogue and some of the accompanying documentation that the rebellions cited here have only more recently been documented effectively on the rebel side, leaving a more balanced approach to the historical record. Sansom can always be counted upon to offer an interesting spin on events known or presumed, forcing the reader outside of their comfort zone as they watch a powerful protagonist assert his own form of control.

Kudos, Mr. Sansom, for helping to mix Tudor history with a strong mystery. I hope that there are more novels to come, as you have a dedicated fan in me, after I stumbled to begin.

A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/248185-a-book-for-all-seasons

Lamentation (Matthew Shardlake #6), by C.J. Sansom

Eight stars

C.J. Sansom is at the top of his genre with this set of Tudor era historical mysteries. By mixing legal conundrums with controversies of the time, the reader is easily transported back in time and enveloped in stories that resonate throughout the centuries. England is at war again, though it is no sovereign state that has declared its opposition. Rather, there is a religious clash that continues at a time when Henry VIII seeks to reunite with past foes. While the Catholic/Church of England clash remains controversial, the emergence of new and troubling Protestant organizations has English folk questioning their neighbours. At the heart of things is Queen Catherine Parr herself, who has penned a manuscript about her own struggles, The Lamentations of a Sinner. In it, Queen Catherine reveals many of her thoughts on religion, which could not only anger her husband, but pave the way for her execution. The queen calls on Matthew Shardlake to attend her at Court, where he is tasked with covertly trying to discover what’s happened to it, as it has gone missing. More troubling, a local printer is found murdered with one of the manuscript’s handwritten pages in his hand. Shardlake realises that he must not only find a murderer, but the written document, doing so under veil of secrecy. With a young man having joined the office to better understand the law, Shardlake may use him for investigative purposes while training him in the law. As Shardlake and his assistant, Jack Barak, seek to find this manuscript, they soon discover more bodies and eventually make the connection to a controversial religious group whose views prove to be at the heart of the religious clash. Adding intrigue to the entire situation, Henry VIII is getting sicker by the day, meaning that both religious camps have the chance to make a play for the coming heir, Prince Edward. Which side will prove victorious and can the highly scandalous writing keep Queen Catherine from losing the respect of her dying husband? In a piece that explores some of the lesser-known aspects of Tudor England, Sansom proves to be a rose amongst patches of clover. Recommended to those who have come to love all things Sansom and readers who enjoy Tudor history.

There are so many pieces to the machinery of a Matthew Shardlake novel that the reader will have to pick and choose which suits them best. C.J. Sansom offers much on which the reader can feast and develops storylines throughout this well-paced series. Keeping history and mystery competing throughout, the reader can find what works best for them as they learn more about the era and the series protagonist. Matthew Shardlake is a wonderful central character whose development has not waned over the series. While there is little mention of flashbacks, Shardlake has enough in his present to keep the reader enthralled. A wonderful legal mind, many refuse to see this side of Shardlake, choosing to focus on his hunchback and writing him off as permanently impeded. Struggling with memories of a horrible naval disaster that still haunts him and trying to define the relationship he has with Queen Catherine so as not to find himself jailed, Shardlake forges ahead with a preliminary case that usually finds itself taking a a backseat to the more controversial events evolving throughout the narrative. The reader is able to see many returning characters whose lives continue to develop, while also seeing new faces enrich the story as they shape the plot’s direction. The story was strong and kept my attention throughout, instilling wonder as England tries to define itself for a second time under Henry VIII. Politics, religion, and regional power are intertwined in this piece, allowing C.J. Sansom to effectively educate and entertain simultaneously. While the series continues to develop, its key elements are in question and there is a sense of sectional finality by the epilogue. A recently published seventh novel will surely help explore some of the questions left unresolved in true Tudor form.

Kudos, Mr. Sansom, for keeping Tudor history alive in this piece of historical fiction. I hope new fans, like me, will discover this and lose themselves in the mastery you have of the genre.

A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/248185-a-book-for-all-seasons

Heartstone (Matthew Shardlake #5), by C.J. Sansom

Eight stars

C.J. Sansom dazzles with his great set of Tudor era historical mysteries, mixing a few legal conundrums with controversies of the time to keep the reader hooked. England is at war, though its citizenry is less than enamoured with the idea. France remains a thorn in the side of King Henry VIII and he has done all he can to prepare the country for battle, including debasing the already fragile currency. Matthew Shardlake watches and wonders what is to come for his country, when he is not spending time at the mental institution visiting a new friend, Ellen Fettiplace. Her time under lock and key is reaching two decades, though she espouses innocence for the charges levied against her. When Shardlake is summoned to Court, he meets with Queen Catherine (Parr) and discovers a new case on which to work. One of the Queen’s former ladies has a legal matter that will require some attention. Her son was a tutor in a household where two young wards of the state were placed. This tutor indicated that there were issues in said household, but before any formal reporting could be done, the tutor was found hanging, though some wonder if it might have been murder. This will require Shardlake to visit the Court of Wards, seeking not only an injunction against the placement of these two wards, but to discover what has been going on. To do so, Shardlake and his assistant, Barak, will have to venture out to interview all involved. Shardlake is prepared for this, as it will give him the chance to learn more about Ellen’s circumstances as well. The Court of Wards handles the mentally infirm as part of their oversight and Ellen’s residence before incarceration was along the route Shardlake must follow. With war coming and soldiers preparing for battle, Shardlake’s inquiries will prove explosive in all senses of the word. Might Ellen not have committed murder as she is said to have done? Could the fire that destroyed the foundry on which she lived not have been of her own doing? And what of these wards, who are apparently not safe in their current placement? Shardlake is ready for anything, including a French invasion, in this stunning novel. A scintillating account of events by C.J. Sansom, who uses history and dramatic effect throughout the piece. Those who have loved the series to date will surely want to continue with this novel.

After a stuttering step on my part, I have come to see that C.J. Sansom educates and entertains the reader with each passing story. As my work involves Child Welfare and Protection, this story was especially interesting to me, as I was able to explore how things were done five centuries before. Matthew Shardlake continues to defy logic and pushes to better understand the Tudor world around him, pushing the limits whenever possible. His adventures take him all over the country, though he cannot shake much of the criticism and mockery, no matter where he goes. With a strong affinity for Ellen Fettiplace, the reader can see a softer side of Shardlake’s character, though there is still something holding him back. While the ‘ward’ case seems less to shine a light on what SHardlake feels, the reader gets more of Barak’s personality shining through, with his wife carrying their child. Series fans will know the monumental nature of this and respect its addition in the story a little more. Shardlake remains a keen legal mind and appears to have the respect of many senior officials at Court, which is significant with the history he possesses. The reader will likely enjoy many of the plot and character advancements found within this piece and I applaud Sansom’s subtle attention to both. Mixing a few characters from the history books alongside a handful of entertaining newbies, Sansom develops a wonderful cast to propel the story forward in many directions. I have said it before and will repeat myself, Sansom has a wonderful way of weaving his characters into a glorious tapestry and will not disappoint. The novel is well-paced and offers more English history with a Tudor flavour, as the country prepares for another battle. The novel is by no means out of the realm of any reader, though its topic and analysis can sometimes give it a ‘deeper’ and more ‘intense’ feel, alongside the long and intricate chapters that may be red flags for some readers. The patient reader may enjoy peeling back the layers of history required to digest the larger plot. I am eager that I gave the series another chance and want to get to the core of the Sansom reading experience.

Kudos, Mr. Sansom, for keeping me wondering as I learn much about the Tudor dynasty. I cannot wait to continue learning with this series.

A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/248185-a-book-for-all-seasons

Revelation (Matthew Shardlake #4), by C.J. Sansom

Eight stars

C.J. Sansom continues with his great set of Tudor era historical mysteries, tapping into some of the controversies of the time to spin intricate tales sure to keep the reader enthralled. Matthew Shardlake has taken on quite a complicated case when asked to defend a young man who has been locked away in a mental facility. His crime, excessive praying and zealousness, leaves many wondering what is to be done. At a time when religious fervour is punishable by death when not in line with the Church of England, Shardlake must get to the bottom of this before things get out of hand. However, there are other issues, particularly when a friend is found murdered. As is often the case, Shardlake cannot steer clear of a mystery, though the King’s Coroner is quick to shut down the investigation. Shardlake is determined to get answers when asked by his friend’s widow. When Shardlake is approached by Archbishop Cranmer, he discovers that there may be more to the murder than meets the eye. It would seem that there are more murders with similar attributes, but those at the highest levels of Court do not want it known publicly. Shardlake examines what little evidence and documentation he can find, only to discover that the killer seems to be following a portion of the Book of Revelation, where death and destruction is rampant. Even with a list of the forms of murder, the interpretation is quite significant, not to mention the choice of victims. It would seem someone is trying to get rid of radical reformers, choosing brutal killings to make their point. When Shardlake and a few others are targeted by someone wanting the investigation stopped, it would seem he is on the right path. While all this is going on, Shardlake cannot forget his client, whose mental state remains as fragile as ever. Something must be done to quell the dramatic reaction of many in England, with ongoing questions at Court at what Henry VIII will do in his search for a new—sixth—wife. This may be one case that Matthew Shardlake wished he had left well alone. Brilliant in its delivery, C.J. Sansom taps into both the era and its intricate scandals to create a mystery like no other. Those who have loved the series to date will surely want to add this to their collection.

This is a great series for those who love their mysteries steeped in history and controversies of another era. C.J. Sansom does well to educate while entertaining the reader in a nuance-filled narrative. The story digs deeper than most of the Tudor history with which I am familiar, usually Henry VIII chasing a new wife or his offspring—Elizabeth—seeking to rule in ways never thought of before. It looks to the religious reformation within England and how powerful entities shaped the development of England and its Church at a time when things were still fairly new and shaky. Sansom continues to offer a little more of the backstory related to Matthew Shardlake. Gritty in his way of thinking, Shardlake faces much retaliation as he defends a religious zealot and comes to terms with his own beliefs in the face of a killer who wants to rid the country of non-traditional believers. The thread of religious dedication is an interesting sub-plot that Sansom has added to create more flavour to the Shardlake character. Shardlake remains a keen legal mind and wonderful investigator, working alongside his assistant, Barak. With a few characters from the history books, Sansom injects what many will already know about the heavy hitters of the era, but also finds time to shape new and unknown people to push the story forward. These characters serve various purposes and help to offer a more ‘down to earth’ approach to the story, with a topic that is anything but peaceful. Sansom has a wonderful way of weaving his characters into a glorious tapestry and will not disappoint. The novel is well-paced and offers more Tudor history as England comes into its own from a religious perspective. The novel is by no means out of the realm of any reader, though its topic and analysis can sometimes give it a ‘deeper’ and more ‘intense’ feel, alongside the long and intricate chapters that may be red flags for some readers. The patient reader may enjoy peeling back the layers of history required to digest the larger plot. I am eager that I gave the series another chance and want to get to the core of the Sansom reading experience.

Kudos, Mr. Sansom, for keeping me curious and wanting to know more. There may be many who write about Tudor times, but your mysteries offer a wonderfully unique angle.

A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/248185-a-book-for-all-seasons

Sovereign (Matthew Shardlake #3), by C.J. Sansom

Eight stars

C.J. Sansom continues to develop his great set of historical mysteries, all set during the Tudor era. With Thomas Cromwell executed, Matthew Shardlake is in definite limbo, trying to distance himself from his one-time superior while keeping a legal practice running effectively. The Cromwell void is filled soon thereafter when Archbishop Cranmer turns to Shardlake and asks that he make his way to York, where King Henry VIII will soon travel. Still reeling from the clashes with the Crown, York is a political zone that simmers with uncertainty, requiring that Shardlake and his new assistant, Barak, always watch themselves. Arriving in York, Shardlake senses that things may not be as troubling as Cranmer posited, seeing a community ready to celebrate with their King. However, when the death of a local glazier appears to be foul play, Shardlake and Barak cannot help but look into it, for the sake of the country’s safety. The victim appears to have fallen from a ladder, but there is surely more to it, which is substantiated when Shardlake discovers a box of documents. He and Barak ponder how to get into them and, once opened, the cache reveals something that Shardlake could not have imagined. Documents discussing the Tudor bloodline and some mention of the past King Richard, a close descendant to the current Henry VIII. Before Shardlake can process what he has glimpsed, he is attacked and the documents disappear. With two mysteries to occupy his time, Shardlake begins his own investigation, though tries to keep the peace when the King arrives to celebrate with his subjects. Dodging death on numerous occasions, Shardlake begins to wonder if the murderer has a determination that will not be sated and seeks to reveal a stunning truth about the legitimacy of the Tudor line. With Barak by his side, Shardlake tries to piece it all together without becoming another victim, while York remains a volatile spot for any southerner. A well-developed mystery that holds the reader’s attention until the final pages, allowing Sansom to use history to his advantage. Recommended for those who love a historical mystery, particularly the reader with a passion for all things Tudor.

This is a wonderfully deep and more intricate mystery series that forces me to think while also enjoying the narrative. Steeped in history and developments of the time, C.J. Sansom chooses to educate while entertaining with a nuance-filled narrative. The story helped to open my eyes to some of the Tudor history, particularly that during the War of the Roses, with York at the centre of all. Sansom also hinted at a little more of the backstory related to Matthew Shardlake, a welcome addition to any piece. A gritty and determined legal mind, Shardlake finds himself in the middle of upheaval, with Henry VIII getting rid of the stain of Thomas Cromwell as he advances on his tumultuous search for a male heir by lusting for anything with breasts. Shardlake must hold his tongue and forge onwards as best he can, hoping that he is one step ahead of his critics throughout. Sansom shows a man still humbled by his hunchback when exploring Matthew Shardlake, taking some time to talk about a childhood that was tough, when seen through the lens of other children, less understanding of difference and wanting to carve out their own identity. Still, Shardlake faces adversity in this new land—York—where many challenge his veracity and capability, as though his back is indicative of feeble mindedness. Shardlake develops a strong attention to detail when it comes to the law, as well as being a wonderful investigator. Having moved the story so far away from London, there are countless others whose presence throughout the novel help enrich the narrative, particularly the contrast between northern and southern sentiment about many things. These characters serve various purposes and the banter is highly educational while also keeping the reader from getting too serious about the reading experience. Sansom has a wonderful way of weaving his characters into a glorious tapestry and will not disappoint. The novel is strong and well-paced, opening yet more Tudor and English history, while questioning what many feel they know. Sansom captures these intricacies while offering a stellar mystery to keep the reader enthralled. The novel is by no means out of the realm of any reader, though its depth and analysis can sometimes give it a ‘deeper’ and more ‘intense’ feel. Peeling back the layers of history and the pace required to digest it all, this is a wonderful story for the patient reader. I am eager that I gave the series another chance and want to get to the core of the Sansom reading experience, with Matthew Shardlake at its centre.

Kudos, Mr. Sansom, for keeping the story strong and highly entertaining. I cannot wait to see what you have in store next, so I’ll rush to get my hands on another novel.

A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/248185-a-book-for-all-seasons

Dark Fire (Matthew Shardlake #2), by C.J. Sansom

Eight stars

Continuing this Tudor-era series, C.J. Sansom develops the foundation for what many will likely call a great set of historical mysteries. Still jilted after an awkward investigation for Thomas Cromwell, Matthew Shardlake is happy to keep his legal practice running with a handful of clients. However, when he is approached to defend Elizabeth Wentworth, Shardlake is not entirely sure he wants the case. Wentworth is accused of killing her cousin by pushing him down a well, but will not enter a plea. Rather, she stands silent, even when brought before the court. With a torturous punishment for not entering a plea awaiting her, Shardlake tries to get Elizabeth Wentworth to at least utter two words, to no avail. In a miraculous turn of events, the case reprieved temporarily by Thomas Cromwell himself, who seeks the assistance of his great investigator. Unable to refuse, Shardlake makes his way to see the King’s counsellor, learning that there is quite the scandal brewing. During the dissolution of the monasteries over the past few years, someone has found a small collection of ‘Greek fire’ a powerful weapon from centuries ago, so powerful that it is said to be able to burn on water. Shardlake is sent to retrieve the instructions to make this weapon, so that it might be presented to Henry VIII after he sees its public display in the coming weeks. Hesitantly, Shardlake agrees to act as emissary and makes his way to the countryside, where he discovers that the two brothers in possession of the Greek fire have been killed and their weapon is gone. What should have been a quick turn of events has since opened into a cataclysmic panic. While Shardlake and his newly assigned deputy scour the communities to locate not only the killer but this volatile weapon, his actual case takes on some interesting twists. While it would seem that Elizabeth Wentworth’s guilt was all but certain, Shardlake discovers something that could turn the case in her favour, but he needs to get her to speak. From investigator to target, Shardlake must dodge an unknown killer and their wrath while keeping the knowledge of Greek fire a secret from the general population. Even as things come to a head, major news comes from Court, something that could change England forever and leave many scrambling for cover. Sansom delivers another winner in this complex-thriller that never loses its momentum. Lovers of Tudor history and mysteries will likely want to add this to their collection.

This is sure to be a wonderful series in the making, though it is a deeper and more intricate type mystery than I am used to reading. Steeped in history and developments of the time, C.J. Sansom educates as he entertains with a narrative that is full of nuances. The story really kept my attention and I hoped to learn a lot more about Matthew Shardlake. The man may be simple in his desires, but Shardlake is far from basic in his presentation throughout the novel. Humbled by his hunchback, Shardlake is forced to deflect many who feel he could never make a name for himself, let alone be a successful solicitor. His attention to detail when it comes to the law is one thing, but Shardlake is happy to see many things that others miss when it comes to investigating, which creates a stronger and more complex narrative for the reader. One can presume that he is irritated at being constantly sought after by Thomas Cromwell, but there is surely a reason for this. I can only hope that future adventures for Matthew Shardlake will be as detail oriented, as I am looking forward to learning much about the man and his development. There are others whose presence throughout help enrich the story and keeps Shardlake from running away with the show. These characters serve various purposes and one can only wonder if they will reappear in future stories, as Shardlake’s interactions seem not yet finished. Sansom has a wonderful way of weaving his characters into a curious tapestry and will not simply allow for minor appearances. The novel is strong and well-paced, set against English history during a time when nothing stayed the same for long. Henry VIII is processing the demise of his fourth and trying to find a fifth wife, which proves to be an interesting backdrop for Tudor fans who are committed to this novel. Sansom captures these intricacies while offering a stellar mystery to keep the reader enthralled. I am eager that I gave the series another chance and want to find out where Sansom sees the story and his protagonist going in the next handful of novels.

Kudos, Mr. Sansom, for a wonderful continuation to the series. I have so much I want to learn and you keep me entertained throughout.

A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/248185-a-book-for-all-seasons

Dissolution (Matthew Shardlake #1), by C.J. Sansom

Eight stars

In the debut novel of this Tudor-era series, C.J. Sansom lays the groundwork for what could be a great set of historical mysteries. After King Henry VIII enacted the dissolution of all monasteries across England, Thomas Cromwell sent commissioners out to ensure the rules were followed in short order. After one such man, Robin Singleton, was reported slain at the monastery in Scarnsea, Cromwell calls for an investigation. Turning to Matthew Shardlake, Cromwell entrusts him with returning after having located the killer and finishing the work that Singleton could not. Shardlake makes his way to Scarnsea, in hopes that this will be a quick legal matter, but soon discovers that there is more to the monastery than meets the eye. While a killer is on the loose, there are other matters that require his attention, including struggles with the transition to the Church of England and with the personal lives of those who work inside the monastery’s walls. Shardlake must also come to terms with the means by which Singleton was killed, decapitation by sword, and stifle the memories of seeing young Anne Boleyn executed not long before in that manner. As Shardlake inches closer to finding the killer, more bodies turn up, leaving him to wonder if this is a single killer or a group who have been targeting individuals for a variety of reasons. Pressured to return to London, Shardlake realises how life outside the big city differs greatly from monastic life, though murder knows no different. Sansom does well with this first in the series, keeping readers curious about what is to come. Recommended for those with a love of all things Tudor and readers who enjoy a well-balanced mystery.

I admit that I struggled trying to read this book years ago, such a shock to many that ripples appeared across those who follow my reviews. I decided to return to see if Sansom might have grown on me, which I must admit must have happened. The story kept my attention and I was curious to see where Matthew Shardlake would go to find a killer out in the country. Shardlake is an interesting protagonist, even for Tudor times. A solicitor by trade, Shardlake is known less for his legal mind that the significant hunchback he possesses. This feature has led many to comment on his abilities, as though posture denotes the ability to compute information. Shardlake may have been sent by the Crown to investigate, but he shows that he is able to explore matters at his own pace and with an attentiveness that gets things done. He is sly and astute without being offensive, particularly towards those who are already on edge. There is surely much more to learn about him, which will come in the next few novels. Others prove wonderful additions to the story, including monks, monastic assistants, and even members of Court who seek Shardlake’s quick responses to get to the bottom of events. Sansom weaves them all together wonderfully and pushes to develop key relationships throughout that will help propel the story forward. The premise of the novel is strong, set against the events in English history that brought Henry VIII much power of the monasteries in his attempt to weed out those who would speak against the Church of England. With the execution of Anne Boleyn and the most recent queen dead in childbirth, there is much going on, even behind the scenes. Sansom captures this while offering a stellar mystery to keep the reader enthralled. Full of information and small details that grow as the narrative develops, Sansom thrusts his protagonist into the middle of it all, while also offering up base reactions to the dissolution of the monastic life, important at the time, though rarely reported. I am eager to see where the series goes and am pleased I took the time to return to the piece. I will try things by audio, as it may have been my trying to trudge through the book alone that left me soured the first time I tried to digest the plot.

Kudos, Mr. Sansom, for a wonderful beginning to a series set during one of my favourite times in history. Let’s see what other mysteries await and how Tudor life will shape it.

A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/248185-a-book-for-all-seasons